Wednesday, January 16, 2013

Don't Let Gravity Get You Down

Thought for the day:  Just because an apple falls one hundred times out of a hundred does not mean it will fall on the hundred and first.  [Derek Landy]

[credit: Morguefile]
Whether a scientist peers through a telescope, or gazes through an electron microscope, if he's paying attention, he's gonna see evidence of circular motion. Planets circle the sun... electrons circle a nucleus... and just last year, an international study revealed that light travels in a distinct vortex in a silicon chip.

Yet another fascinating mystery about this universe we live in, huh?

Well, a long-time fascination with a similar mystery prompted Stephen to ask in his comment on my Oregon post last Friday why I hadn't mentioned anything about the Oregon Vortex.

Um, simple. To be perfectly honest, I never heard of it before.

So, I decided to learn something about it, and then put together a quickie easy  lazy-assed  marvelously informative post on the subject. As always, my idea of doing a little research turned into another head-first dive into the rabbit hole. (The Internet is a very dangerous place for an information junkie.)

Anyhow, let's give it a (ahem) whirl, shall we?

[credit: Wikipedia]
The red smoke in this picture provides a dramatic visual to illustrate the spherical motion of a vortex. 

The Oregon Vortex is a spherical force field, which we could think of as an invisible whirlpool of concentrated energy. (Kinda like in that picture... minus the red.) Along with that force field comes gravitational anomalies... a scientific way of saying weird stuff happen. 

Gravity is a contributing factor in nearly 73 percent of all accidents involving falling objects.  [Dave Barry]


[credit: Morguefile]
The environment around the vortex defies gravity, bends light, scares animals, twists plant life into contorted shapes, and gives people an eerie feeling...

The Oregon Vortex, located in Gold Hill, isn't the only vortex in the world. Matter of fact, it isn't even the only one in the United States. Other well-known spots in the U.S. include Mt. Shasta, CA, Hungry Horse, MT, and four areas in Sedona, AZ. (There are plenty of others, too, maybe even the Spook Hill we visited in Florida last year.)

Numerous articles equate these worldwide vortexes to Earth chakras, and say that ancient civilizations purposely built sacred monuments on these spots... like Stonehenge and the Great Pyramids, among others. Earth's seven major chakras are described as follows;

  • Mt. Shasta --- California, U.S.A.
  • Lake Titicaca --- border of Bolivia & Peru
  • Uluru-Katatjuta --- Australia
  • Glastonbury & Shaftsbury --- England
  • Great Pyramids of Giza & Mt. Sinai; Mt. of Olives, Jerusalem
  • Kuh-e Malek Siah --- borders of Iran, Afghanistan & Pakistan
  • Mt. Kailas --- Tibet
Those are allegedly the spots of most concentrated energies, but there's a whole network of interconnected energy fields around the world... some positive, some negative. Maps showing the locations and connectivity of these areas remind me of a cosmic sine wave girding the planet's waistline. Weird. 

Articles comparing these vortexes to human chakras, and mentioning such things as being at one with the universe seem very New Age-y, but then again, like it says in Ecclesiastes: There is no new thing under the sun. 

Just some things we don't yet understand

Like the Oregon Vortex... where people inexplicably lean toward magnetic north, bottles roll uphill, and people seem to grow and shrink. Wanta see? Here's a couple videos. I know your time is valuable, so here's a short one, if you just want a peek...



And a longer one, if you care to see a little more... 


                                     Fascinating, huh? Did you already know about this stuff? 

                                     Until next time, take care of yourselves. And each other.

[credit: seniorark]

                                You can't blame gravity for falling in love.  [Albert Einstein]

67 comments:

  1. >> . . . Did you already know about this stuff?

    Yeah.

    ~ D-FensDogg
    'Loyal American Underground'

    ReplyDelete
  2. Years ago, when I was a kid in Southern California, there was a place at Knott's Berry Farm (Buena Park) called the Haunted Shack. It had the same perceptual illusions as the Oregon Vortex. The phenomena was supposedly unexplained. I've heard that it had something to do with the peculiar angles on which the building was constructed and the sloping hillside on which it stood.

    I don't profess to explain it, folks. I ain't no scientist.....

    By the way, the Haunted Shack was torn down in 2000.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Knott's Berry Farm is definitely one of the places mentioned in some of the articles I read. Can't remember what its status is, though. Some alleged vortex sites have been judged to be fakes based on optical illusions, and others are simply less powerful and stable than those seven "Earth chakras". I guess you could call them "transient". (Not sure, but some days, it feels like one may be traveling through our house...)

      Delete
  3. I've never known much about vortexes, I just know a whirlpool is one and will suck you in, same as a twister is one and will also suck you in. It appears now that even researching vortexes will suck you in....

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Great comment! Yep, research sucks me into its vortex all the time.

      Delete
  4. There is another one in Fl (can't recall the name) but we'd take my son's dog, who was constant motion and once near the vortex, he would sit quietly.... not quite like the meditating dog in the picture but he was unusually quiet. Ha. I don't know much about vortexes but I'd just like to be able to witch for water.
    Interesting post.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. There are so many of these things around the world, I wouldn't be surprised if there's at least one in every state. Believe it or not, I went witching for water when I was in college. Well, to be more precise, I went along with a fella who actually did the witching. We wandered all around the campus, and he claimed that he found a water main. What can I say? He was a little weird, but cute as a button.

      Delete
  5. I think I've heard of the Oregon vortex before. It's listed on a website of the strangest places in America which I stumbled across in research for writing (of course).

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sounds like something worthy of showing up in one of your books someday. (People who don't get caught up in researching don't know what they're missing, do they?)

      Delete
  6. This is absolutely fascinating. I had never heard of these before. I had heard of vortexes but I didn't realize that they were centered in certain geographical locations. Fascinating!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Glad it piqued your interest. I think it's fascinating, too.

      Delete
  7. Never heard of that! Fascinating.

    Also, "Lake Titicaca" always makes me smile. And then snicker immaturely.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Great minds think alike, but hey! if they didn't want us to laugh, they shoulda picked a different name.

      Delete
  8. I hadn't heard of the Oregon Vortex, even though I lived there for 10 years. I have heard of and visited the ones in Sedona. And I've been to Mt. Shasta. I am fascinated by these things. And where did you find the photo of the dog meditating. That's hilarious.
    karen

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Since you lived in Oregon and didn't know about the vortex there, I feel a little better that I'd never heard of it, either.

      The pic? I should've given the source. Oops. I'll edit that after I finish answering all the comments. Anyhow, it came from a site called seniorark.com They have a TON of great pics there.

      Delete
  9. Fascinating! So that's why my head's always in a spin, is it?!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yep, that must be it! (Isn't it lovely to have a reasonable explanation to offer for our bouts of ditziness... oops, I mean dizziness... now?)

      Delete
  10. SUSAN ~
    I must admit that I did NOT know dogs meditate. That's probably why they're better animals than cats.
    :-)

    ~ Stephen

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I've had some dogs who could've benefited from some serious meditating... And you lay off my cats!

      Delete
  11. Never heard of the Oregon vortex thing before. Our world is so bizarre sometimes. But I have seen the meditating dog before. I sent that pic to a friend who needed to chill out once. :))

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yeah, there's a lot of bizarre things in the world. (And I love to read about them.) That dog pic is something else, isn't it?

      Delete
  12. Informative post. I've visited the Oregon vortex and a similar "Mystery Spot" near Santa Cruz, California. Judging from eccentricities of some houses we've lived in here, I conclude these anomalies are spreading.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Uh-HUH! So you've frequented some of these extraordinary places, huh? I see. Some people say there's a correlation between those spots and extraterrestial visitors, ya know. Just might explain some of your extraordinary thought processes... Dude.

      Delete
  13. Sus, I love your opening quote so, so much.

    Well, here was another post that had me leaning closer to the screen as I read -- *the* definitive sign of perfect engagement for me, personally. I do it with books, too, pulling them in closer to my nose as if though a part of me is yearning for some kind of osmotic oneness with the material. So! High compliments to the ideas elucidated on, here.

    Further, I have a theory about our experience of time and it has to do with vortices and motion -- spinning -- so the things about which you have written here are things I have thought about to some degree. Finally, I now officially want to visit Mt. Shasta -- the most accessible point for me on any given family vacation in the planning stages.

    Have a great day, friend.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. ps
      I'm bookmarking this post to come back to it.

      Delete
    2. Glad ya liked it. I had a feeling it might be right up your alley. And I am duly honored to be bookmarked, my dear.

      Delete
  14. Now that's something I'd like to see for myself some day. A vortex....what would happen if you walked right into it I wonder?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. From what I've read, people claim to feel "strange". (Heck, I feel that way most of the time!) And they have difficulty standing up straight. (Again... most days!)

      It'd really be neat to visit one of the "potent" vortexes someday, though. Then I'd at least have an excuse for being strange.

      Delete
  15. Always wondered what would happen if one opened up near me. Would I walk through? hmm don't know. But if they are calming that be nice too. Great quote too.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks for dropping by and leaving a comment, dear sir. After reading some of your blog posts, I'm a teensy bit disappointed you didn't mark your visit with a rhyme. (Maybe next time?)

      Delete
    2. Some don't like it when I do that
      They get a hate on for the cat
      But now that I know
      Each time a rhyme will flow

      Delete
    3. I hope you don't mind;
      I had to ask.
      But, pbbbt! No prob...
      You're up to the task!

      Delete
  16. Love your blog! Maybe we could follow each other on bloglovin or GFC? Please leave me a comment or follow me and I will follow you =)

    http://lepetitplastique.blogspot.com/

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks. I do appreciate your visit. The models and styles on your blog are quite beautiful, but I'm afraid my idea of fashion these days is a clean pair of sweat pants.

      Delete
  17. I love your header picture. Are spuds going to grow there in the summer?

    Oh my, after reading all this information, I think my brain just went into a vortex. I am going to sit next to the dog now and start chanting.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks. Oh, the spuds will be back eventually, but I was beginning to get a bit bored with them., and thought I'd try some other pics for a while.

      Maybe you and the dog should both take a nap...

      Delete
  18. THAT is so cool! I learn something everytime I come here. LOL

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks. Glad to hear it! (Just call me Teach.)

      Delete
  19. This is what I enjoy most about your blog, the fact that there is something new and interesting each and every time.

    I love anything to do with subjects such as this but I don't always understand them. So a huge thanks for explaining about the Oregon Vortex, in words that my simple brain could decipher.
    There is something to be said about Earth's chakras. In place such as Glastonbury and Shaftsbury, as well as Stonehenge, there is a definite vibe that flows through those places, giving them an almost 'otherworldly feeling.

    Also that picture of the dog is kinda freaking me out a little. :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks. I'm glad you've been finding some of my posts enjoyable. Have you visited Stonehenge to "feel the vibes" yourself? It looks remarkable in pictures, so I can only imagine what it must be to be right there in front of it. Last I heard, it's fenced off so people can't get as close as they used to, but even looking at it from behind a fence must be quite an experience.

      Oh, and don't worry about the dog. I hear he's a real pussy cat.

      Delete
    2. I did visit Stonehenge long before they fenced it off.
      My friends and I could feel a strange sort of humming sensation beneath our feet but we also felt peaceful and tranquil in the presence of the stones. It truly was a magical experience.

      Delete
    3. How wonderful! I'd guess that only a very small percentage of the world's population can say they've had that same experience. (I hope you took pictures!)

      Delete
  20. There is one of those places up in the Smokie Mountains around Cherokee, North Carolina. It was great fun.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Really? Neat. We've been to the Cherokee Indian reservation, and to the casino, but I never heard about a vortex in that area. We'll have to check it out the next time we're up that way.

      Delete
  21. You'll have us all chanting soon "Aum mani padme, Aum...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Nah, if we chant, it'll have to be that silly one my husband used to say" Oh-wat-a-goo-si-am."

      Delete
  22. This is fascinating stuff. I didn't know that light travels in a distinct vortex. So cool. I did know that if you blindfold someone and tell them to walk in a straight line across a field, they'll actually walk in circle.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Well, all light doesn't travel in a vortex; the light in a silicon chip does, and that's pretty amazing in itself. As for that walking in a circle stuff, I don't even think you need to put on a blindfold. (Heck, I'm ALWAYS going in circles!)

      Delete
  23. Interesting stuff.

    I'm beginning to suspect a vortex location in my kitchen...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Shhhhh.... I'm pretty sure there's one on our toilet, but it comes and goes...

      Delete
  24. I didn't know about this. I want to stay on the side where I'll look taller. I'm the shortest one in my family.

    Love,
    Janie

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yeah, tall... short... that's pretty impressive, but I'd like to visit a place that makes me look THINNER. (And I'm not talking about the gym!)

      Delete
  25. This is really interesting stuff! I've been to one of those places—very strange... :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks; I'm glad you found it to be interesting. Very neat that you've actually visited one of these place.

      Delete
  26. my mind is already spinning a way to use this information in a future tale or two. And yes, I can easily get sucked into the search for knowledge vortex and lose hours.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Absolutely... some GREAT fodder for a tale. I'm glad to hear I'm not the only one who loses all track of time while doing research. (Or reading... or writing...)

      Delete
  27. Susan, you come up with the most interesting posts. This was very interesting and was new to me, although I vaguely remember something somewhere with a level surface and people seemingly getting taller and smaller.

    And, nice to see you hold your own with Pat Hatt. cm

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks. Glad ya liked it. Hopefully, I'll be able to keep up with Pat... I have a penchant for silly poetry and corny jokes.

      Delete
  28. Very cool blog. Interesting posts. ;)
    Nice atmosphere guests with you here on the blog. ;]
    Yours. Have a nice day. !

    Follow me on facebook fanpage
    I'm very concerned about this, please. :)
    https://www.facebook.com/pages/In-another-light/413836138693856

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Dziekuje, Patrycja. I really appreciate you coming to visit my blog. Your photographs are absolutely beautiful.

      Delete
  29. Interesting stuff. I never heard of these vortexes. I love science and the mysteries out there. Thanks for sharing this with us.

    ReplyDelete
  30. Hi Susan .. never heard of it - how interesting .. but I'd love to see it ... fascinating - so pleased Stephen asked you to investigate ..

    Fun (I hope!!) .. cheers Hilary

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm glad Stephen mentioned it to, because I would've never come across it on my own. Yep... definitely fun!

      Cheers to you, too. Here's to a great weekend.

      Delete